Old Woodies for Enthusiasts of Wood-bodied Cars and Trucks

woodie cars
woodie cars  

Woodie Resource Directory

Woodie Terminology
 Brake
English term for a sturdy wagon used for hunting. Early types were horse-drawn. The name came to be applied to motorcars similar to the American station wagon. See Shooting Brake.

 Break de Chasse
French term for a sturdy wagon used for hunting. Early types were horse-drawn, the name came to be applied to motorcars similar to the American station wagon. Synonymous with the English term Shooting Brake. Break, a short form of the term, is now applied to mini-vans, without regard for material of construction.

 Beach Buggy
Along the U.S. East coast, the term was popularized after WW2 to describe vehicles used on ocean surf fishing expeditions. Later, it was applied to cut-down Volkswagon chassis rebodied with an open fibreglass shell.

 Beach Wagon
Dating back to the 1920's, the term was used in New England to describe wooden-bodied vehicles whose varied jobs included transporting folks to and from the beach. See Beach Buggy.

 Camion
French and Italian for truck, does not imply wooden construction. Also Camionette (FR); Camionetta (IT): a small truck.

 Camiones
Spanish for trucks, does not imply wooden construction. Also Camioneta: a small truck.

 Canadienne
The model name of a post-WW2 Peugeot 402 break de chasse. The Canadienne name found broad use in France as a term to describe any wooden station wagon. Also used as a model name by International Harvester.

 Canopy Express
A light commercial truck with full length top and open or screen sides.

 Carrossier
French for coach-builder.

 Carryall
An American term for an enclosed wagon built on a truck chassis, usually of all steel construction.

 Charabanc
A large public service vehicle which used for the carriage of passengers for reward other than as an omnibus. A tour bus.

 CKD
Abbreviation for "Completely Knocked Down", a common term for reducing the size of an item for economical shipping. After arriving at the destination, the item could be quickly assembled into the finished product. This technique was used on some U.S. built woodies shipped to foreign countries.

 Commercial Chassis
American manufacturer's term used in the mid 1900's for a vehicle sold without bodywork aft of the windshield and cowl. It may include running boards and rear fenders - or not.

 Countryman
A model name for several wood-trimmed estate cars produced by Austin, including the Mini.

 Depot Hack
A passenger carrying wagon for hire commonly found at American train depots in the first half of the 20th century.

 Estate
A term used in th U.K. for cars with a roofline extending to the rear of the vehicle, synonymous with the American 'station wagon'. Subsequently used by Buick for their 'Estate Wagon' model line.

 Express
A light commercial truck used for the prompt delivery of goods.

 Giardiniera
Italian term used to describe a station wagon or a classic Italian pickled vegetable recipe consisting of a rich variety of vegetables flavoured with vinegar. Also Giardinetta, a small station wagon, and a model name for a Fiat 500 wagon produced after WW2.

 Iron Mountain
The name of the Ford Motor Company plant on the Michigan upper peninsula where Ford built woodie station wagons. The company had vast reserves of timber in the area. Initially the mill manufactured wooden body framework for the steel body Model T. As the company transitioned to steel reinforced bodies, the excess capacity turned to production of the familiar Ford Model A station wagon.

 Huckster
A peddlers truck, usually with flared side boards and a canopy.

 Jitney
An American term for a small bus or station wagon that carries passengers over a regular route on a flexible schedule. Usually with two facing seats along the sides behind a transverse front seat.

 Kombi
Commonly used in Europe to describe a station wagon or van.

 Mountain Wagon
An early name for rugged American motorized wagons in the early 1900's. These predecessors to the bus had bench seating, open sides and frequently had a canopy roof.

 Omnibus
A large public service vehicle used on a definite route for the carriage of passengers who are carried at separate fares and are picked up and set down along such route whether on request or at fixed stopping places.

 Open Express
A light commercial truck without a top over the bed - a pickup truck.

 Phaeton
A vintage automobile with two cross seats, usually four doors, and a folding top.

 Shooting Brake
An English term once synonymous with wood-paneled estate cars, the term 'shooting brake' now indicates the type of vehicle, but without regard for material of construction.

 Skiff
A style prominent in the mid-twenties to mid thirties among exclusive European coach-builders. These were boat-tailed bodies, usually made of wood in a manner similar to conventional boats. The 'deck' resembled that of a boat and was frequently made of mahogany planks. The great French carrossier Jean Henri Labourdette is considered the originator of the style.

 Station Sedan
Packard's model name for their 22nd series woodie station wagon introduced in 1948.

 Station Wagon
Originally, a horse-drawn wagon suitable for transport of passengers and goods to and from the Railroad station. Now used to describe any automobile with a roofline extending horizontally to the rear of the car.

 Suburban
Used to describe a large closed motorcar capable of transporting passengers and parcels. The term was used as a model name by several American manufacturers, including Nash, Plymouth, Chevrolet and GMC.

 Torpedo
A vintage car with a long narrow low slung body.

 Traveler
An American term for a camper's wagon. Ford made a Traveler version of its Model A woodie station wagon.

 Traveller
A model name for the wood-trimmed Morris Minor and Mini Minor estate cars.

 Wagonette
A light wagon with two facing seats along the sides behind a transverse front seat.

woodie wood

Please send all suggestions, refutations and corrections to mail@oldwoodies.com.

Home
Contents
Search
Features
Gallery
Shop Talk
Calendar
Resources
Dealers & Vendors
Professionals
Clubs
Terminology
Classifieds
Publications
Links

Click to Email Old Woodies
Email Old Woodies

old woodys
©1999-2009
oldwoodies.com